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Full text of "Photographic views of Tampa Bay hotel, Tampa, Florida"

• 319 
T2 T27 
ICopy 1 





Gass. 
Book. 



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T2T27 



Copyiight, 1895, by Fred Roblin, (or Tampa Bay Hotel. 






n rUiW BUFFALO 




TAMPA BAY HOTEL.- EAST FRONT 



PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEWS 



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Ct' w'^^^C' 



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ONE OF THE nAGHIFICEHT HOTELS OWNED BY 
THE PLANT SYSTEM. 






0. H. KING, 

/Aar\ager. 




^r^- 



TAMPA BAV HOTEL , V/EST FRONT. 



-05^^^~* 




THE TA/vVPA BAY HOTEL. 



THE PRESENT TI/AE, when living is so luxurious, and luxurj^ so 
contagious," the latest and most scientific ideas must be adapted in estab- 
lishing a place of resort. 

" Peninsulas have al-ways been sought by inankind as favorite places of 
residence. Their fortunate climate and genial air 6ive the in advanta6e3 over 
every other location," says the Avell-kno-wn savant, Dr. W. C. Van Bibber. 

The vrord climate einbraces an assembla6e of many facts of which the atimos- 
phere is only one of the factors. "The climate of peninsulas derives one of its pecu- 
liarities fi-oiTi the fact that the heat of the land dries the air as it comes from the 
sea. On account of this, and also from other causes, the air and climate of a sinaller 
peninsula attached to a lar6er one or jutting off fron:i it, often differs from that of its 
parent very materially. Such a fact is important and has not heretofore been observed 



and latilized to the extent it deserves. It may -with tnith be said that the Florida 
Gulf Coast stands pre-eininent and unrivaled before all other lands or peninsulas. It 
has a different latitude from most of them, a different topography, a different slope 
to the winter sun." 

It is like the invi6oratin^ maritime climate -whioh has made the Mediterranean 
coast and resorts so celebrated, possessin6 in an exceptional degree purity of atn-ios- 
phere and dryness. The equable, healthj- and balmy climate of the Gulf Coast of 
Floidda offers unparalleled attractions to invalids, tourists and sportsmen. As to 
extent of surface offering and affording attractions of many kinds on land and ^v£lter, 
Florida is the largest • of any of the Gulf States east of the Mississippi River. It is 
400 miles from north to south ; an average of nearly 100 miles from ocean to gulf, 
with a m.agnificent coast line on the west. 

■•In the Gulf of Mexico is a basin 13,000 feet deep, and larger in extent than the 
State of Georgia. It is called ' Sigsbey's Deep.' Has this immensely deep basin an 
effect upon the surface water of the gulf, \vhich is nine degrees F. ^varmer than that 
in the Atlantic in the same latitude? The temperature at the bottom of this basin is 
37 degrees F. Is it that the gulf is landlocked and its waters heated by the sun — or 
does the dynamic force of the water at these great depths expel its latent heat ? The 



t-v^o facts are here placed side by side as they exist in nature. The tropic peninsula 
and the deep sea basin — one is as true as the other." 

All of these scientific facts have bsen -well -weighed and 6iven due consideration 
in the selection of the site for the celebrated Tampa Bay Hotel at Tampa, Florida. 
It is located upon a sub=peninsula %vhich projects out between Old Tampa and Hills- 
borou6h bays. It is situated at Tampa, and has been consti'ucted to meet all the 
sanitarj^ and luxurious requiren:Lents of this fastidious and exactin6 a6e. In its mag- 
nificent architectui-al proportions, crowned vv^ith unique to\vers, 61itterin6 minarets and 
crescents, it is the most prominent and conspicuous feature of the landscape for miles 
and iTiiles, from land or -water. The beautiful 6roand3 slope, do-wn to the river. On 
the lawn is a stately and majestic wide-spreadin6 live oak, said to be the famous 
tree under which Osceola, the Indian ^varrior chief, capitulated. Beautiful 6rassy 
slopes lead do-wn to palin-shaded walks, -with 6or6eous flo-wex^s bloomin6 -with the 
prodigal splendor of the tropics, 6ivin6 a forei6n air to the scene that greatly 
enhances its loveliness. The style of the architecture of the hotel is Byzantine. The 
arch and crescent are nnultiplied in the most fascinating and picturesque variety. 
The roofs are rather flat, the lon6 horizontal lines only sli6htly broken after the 
manner of the Orient. It is absolutely fire-proof. To meet the demands of all 6uests 



there are steam heat and open fire-places also. It is lighted with electricity through^ 
out. Has elevators for passengers and ba^^age ; private bath with every suite, electric 
bells, and telephones ; in fact, every " modern improvement." Spacious and elaborately 
ornamented piazzas on both sides of the house. There is not a dark spot in the 
buildin6 : it has 735 windows. Each room, is an outside room ; all of them admit 
the sunlight and the refreshing and delicious salt breezes from bay, river and gulf. 
The interior is finished and decorated with the most artistic and exquisite 
taste. The furniture is inostly imported, having been made to order in Paris. 
Some of the %vonderfull5'- beautiful rugs and carpets w^ere specially woven for 
the hotel. Those for the 6rand salon, parlors and reception rooms are mar= 
vels of beauty. There are cabinets, pictures, statuary, bric-a-brac — 
nothing that artistic taste can suggest or unlimited means purchase 
is wanting to nriake the Tampa Bay Hotel the most comfortable 
and luxurious public place of abode on the American 
continent. If anything in the way of splendor could 
astonish the American traveling public, this 
hotel — \vonderful as an enchanted palace, --v y^ 

-'si". 

situated almost upon the southern outpost 




ON THE RIVER. 



of the United States— will not onlj^ astonish, bvit delight them. Fort Brook, of Tampa, 
one of the oldest military reservations in the United States (one that has also achieved 
celebrity in the halls of Congress), affords a fine picture from the hotel piazzas and 
balconies. It is yet covered by the primeval ^rove of live-oaks, -whose stately branches 
are draped with the graceful Spanish moss, lon^ streamers floating out -upon the 
breeze — fit emblems of mournin6 for the brave spirits that have inade Fort Brook 

historic. It is no lon6er a military post. While it was garrisoned 
the arniy reports showed it to be one of the healthiest 
stations in the United States. 

Dr. Lon6, a surgeon in the United States 
Army, -wrote in regard to the climate and salu= 
brity of Fort Brook ; ' ' This post has always 
been regarded as a delightful station ; here the 
tropical fruits, such as the orange, lemon, lime, 
banana, pineapple, find a congenial climate ; 
vegetation is continuous throughout the year. 
Flowers of every description, tender hot=house plants, and vegetables are all growing 
and maturing in January, and at the same season the water of the bay is of a 




OLD FORT BROOK. 



temperature to admit of bathing. Yet everyone who has traveled in Florida knows 
there are a few cold days, and that it is difficult to locate the frost-line. But the 
whole year possesses so equable a cliniate that in the estimation of the inhabitants 
the present season is al'ways better than the last." Florida is to-day and is lon6 
likely to be the m.ost popular of winter resorts ; its popularity is enhanced by the 
opportunity its 6enial climate affords for continuous outdoor life and amusements, 
fishing and hunting, boating, bathin6, etc. The water hereabout is the home of the 
famous pompano, conceded by epicures and Gourmands to be the most exquisitely fla= 
vored and perfect table fish in the world. Here also abound the lordly Tarpon (or 
Silver Kin6, as he has been christened), Spanish mackerel and many other celebrated 
fish can be cau6ht in the river and bay. In this vicinity the beds of oysters, clams 
and other shellfish are as lar^e and fine in quality as those to be found in Maryland 
and Virginia. One special feature must be mentioned : it is the marvelous purity of 
water of the artesian -well from which water is supplied to the hotel. It occupies the 
spot where, legend says, old Ponce fancied the " Fountain of Youth " must be hidden, 
and -who knows but it was somewhere in that region, and this ^vonderful artesian 
■well may be endowed with some or all of its astonishin6 virtues. The serene beauty 
of the Florida nights have a peculiar fascination, for here the moon shines -with a 



brilliancy and radiance that almost rivals the sun. The 61itterin^ hosts of southern 
stars deck the measureless azure doine of heaven, as they flame out like je^vels upon 
the brow of ni^ht. The ease and speed with which the Tampa Bay Hotel may be 
reached from every quarter are greatly in its favor. 

Unexcelled train service, \\^ith luxurious sleepin6 and parlor cars, brin6 the traveler 
directly upon the 6round to the very porch of the hotel. 

A noted physician says ; ' ' Were I sent abroad to search for a haven of rest for 
tired man, where ne^v life would coixie with every san, and slumber full of sleep \vith 
every ni6ht, I would select the Gulf Coast of Florida. It is the kindest spot, the most 
perfect paradise, — more beautiful it could not be made, still calm and eloquent in every 
feature." 





THE ESPLANADE - 




FROM THE TOWERS. 



■•A 




TORS ENTERING THE HOTEL GROUNDS from the Avenue 
iss through a handsome triple 4ate^vay between massive brick 
piers supporting elaborately wrought iron 6ates and capped \vith urns 
holdin6 ^reat century plants. The gate-keeper's lod6e is just to the 
einbowered in rich foliage. The towering minarets, crowned \vith 
hining crescents ; the quaintly hooded circular dormer -windows 
jutting from the bright metal surface of the cone=shaped domes ; the 
loopholes and little balconies are counterparts of those in the land of 
Mohammed, from whence the Muezzin cries the hour of prayer. 



■!^ 




GATE ENTRANCE. -FROM THE AVENUE 



'^l 



yf^iCcOAIHG PROA THE NORTH, EAST, OR WEST the train, 



// )E? /^aSter a stop 
'" jJi^fV-A-.l^l-id^e spam 



of a few miniites at Tampa City, crosses a substantial 



'» / , 



view of the spacious grounds and east front of the hotel is had. 
riie tourist whose destination is the Tampa Bay Hotel does not leave the train 
T(fntil it is within the shadow of the stately building, \vhere he can alight 
upon a concrete walk that leads direct to the broad piazza and handsome 
entrance. 




ARRIVAL OF THE TRAIN. 




GUEST WILL PAUSE UPON THE STEPS to admire the 
:h profusion of flo-wer and foliage that is blooming all about him. 
rectly in front a small fountain is spi'ayin^ its cooling drops about 
circular bed of brilliant acalypha ; at either side of the piazza stairs 
^rand specimens of alpina nciutans, melon pa-w-pa'ws, etc., and, 
twined about the roof supports, the fragrant Arabian jessamine fills the air 
with perfume. The entry into the hotel rotunda is inade through one of 
three imposing doors, of mahogany and cut glass beneath ornate inoorish 
arches of terra cotta. 




WEST FRONT ENTRANCE PIAZZA. 




HCIHG ABOUT THE ROTUNDA, the newly arrived visitor can 
scarcely imagine that he has entered the business portion of the 
hotel. The rich red carpeting coverin6 the floor, the 6reat divans, 
the innumerable rooking and easy chairs scattered about, the bronze 
'^^gfcatuBS, antique vases and urns, the beautiful paintin6s upon the walls 
and Irare bric=a=brac everywhere, the tropical plants ^rowin6 in such pro- 
fusion — all su^^est the pleasant sittin6-room of a lar6e, MSry \arge, family. 
And such it is, for here assemble, day tind evening, Quests of both sexes to 
pass the time in social companionship. 




ROTUNDA LOOKING TOWARD OFFICE. 




<CCUPYIHG a very siTiall amount of room in the southwest corner 



of the rotunda, as if it were of the least importance in an apart- 
^J^\J\ \naent so replete -with ornament and rich furnishings, and so 
^^^' G> Jdevoted to comfort and luxury, is the office of this hotel, as 
ornarnental in its way as any of the sixrroundin6s. The wide counter is of 
Spanish mahogany, beautifully carved and hi6hly finished ; the railings 
are of burnisheid copper, in fantastic designs. A door to the ri6ht 6ives 
access to those having business behind the counter, and on the ^vall at one 
end is a lar6e clock, beneath which are crossed Moorish SAVords. 




THE OFFICE. 




\/PPORTED BY EI6HT AARBLE COLUAHS a balcon5- ovei- 
looks the lotunda from the first floor. An artistically cai-^'ed rail- 
ing of Spanish iTiaho6any surrounds it, and all aboLit are easy 
chairs, rockers and sofas of odd workinanship and beautiful designs, 
p^on the walls are soine rare canvases from the biaishes of old masters and 
Vorks from the studios of modern painters. Gobelin tapestries, statuary-, 
bronzes, French-plate mirrors, urns and vases of tropical plants and flowers, 
add to the 6enei'al effect, which is both rich and elegant. Large French 
windows open upon balconies overlooking the piazzas and lawns beyond. 




A GALLERY OF ART. 




UIETLY ELEGANT, in entire keeping with the purpose for which 
it has been set apart, is the reading room, on the left of the south 
corridor leading from the rotunda. The style of finish is ebony 
, r^^- ^l^nd gold, making a decided contrast to the milk-white -walls and 
~'y / ceiling. The furniture is in dark woods and upholstered in morocco and 
-•■^ .^ plain leather. Some of the chairs and sofas are beautifully carved and in- 
/'i-^ laid. Richly framed paintings adorn the avails, art albums and books of 
^ travel repose upon stands, and a newspaper rack with files of the leading 
publications of the country. 




m n > ^ 



THE READING ROOM. 




f^^AHDlHG IN A CORNER OF THE ROTUNDA, near the office, 

is a bronze 6roup that recalls hallowed menriories of childhood's 

happy hours and the innocent tales that then seemed so real, the 

morals of -which were not fully understood until later on in life. 

T^is is "Little Red E,idin6 Hood." The artist has evidently chosen that 

portion of the story in which the wily wolf is propoundin6 those questions 

" to the little miss, the answers to which contain the information that enables 

him later on to so successfully carry on his masquerade. The statue is 

very lifelike. 




LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD. 




^POSITB THE WEST ENTRANCE to the rottmda, surmount^ 
ing one of the luxurious divans, is a fine bronze from the cele- 
Y^^*®"i foundry of Maurice Denonvilliers, Paris. The subject 
■^' J (^Esmeralda and the Goat," from Victor Hu6o's Hunchback of 
Notm Dame, and the artist (E. Houssin) has certainly created a very spirited 
statue, in which Esmeralda is depicted as holding aloft a tambo while execLit- 
in^ a pas seul, that the goat, erect upon hindquarters, is strivin6 to accom- 
pany. 




ESMERALDA AND THE GOAT. 



C^^^lf^^^^"^' '^'^'^"^'^ ^° ^■^^'^ ^^^^^ °^ *^® ^®^^ entrance is another bronze 
^jILCS/^'''^^ invariably attracts the attention of visitors. "Naiad at the 
^J^. -P^th" has been a favorite subject of painters and sculptors but 
^J .never has it been more beautifully treated than by the artist of 
^ figure. The pose is upon bended knee, with one hand thrown over the 
shapely head, while the other rests li6htly upon the ground in support of 
the body. Further to the right, near one of the entrances to the 6rand 
parlor, is another fine bronze, "The Top Spinner." 




NAIAO AT THE BATH. 




ICEABLE FOR ITS EXTREAE RICHNESS OF COLORING 

nd striking contrasts of flo^^rers, in which the pure white of the 

lily enunciates the vivid scarlet and orange of the ladies' 



alia 



' \ci^ar plant, is the ^roupin6 of blooms about a mammoth vase of 
^curious d)esi6n that stands to the left of the entrance to the corridor on the 
north of the rotunda. In the corridor is stationed a maid, vi^hose duty it is 
to explain to visitors the history of the many valuable pieces of furniture 
in the ^rand salon and Loiiis XIV. room. 




A HALLWAY ENTRANCE. 




.-'UST INSIDE THE ENTRANCE to the corridor leading to the 
Solarium and dining room the ^uest is afforded an excellent example 
of the contrast between the odd and the beaiitiful in art. Guarding 
one of the entrances to the ^rand salon are two curious little 
^I^P^mes," su^gestin^ legends of the Black Forest. Beside them is a rich por= 
c^^^n vase, the base of which is composed of excellently modeled swans, 
while one of the beautiful creatures is posed iipon the top, and near by a ^rand 
Japanese work in bronze. This corridor attracts the attention of every visi- 
tor, as upon its walls are hung some fine 6obelin tapestries, rare paintings, 
engravings and etchings. 




THE GNOMES ON GUARD. 




^ERY CASKET HAS A, 6EA which its owner thinks surpasses 
all the others, and every visitor to the Tampa Bay Hotel has a 
similar feeling after having vie-wed the Louis XIV. (or French) 
room, as it has been called. The most striking piece of furniture 
in this room is one which is understood to be a genuine Louis XIV. 6em. 
It is a combination of cabinet (richly inlaid and polished), clock, mirror and 
paintin6, and extends froin. the floor almost to the ceiling. In front of it 
stands a table which is a beautiful sample of marquetry. Chairs, comer 
pieces, and other articles are equally beautiful. 




LOUIS XIV., OR FRENCH ROOM. 




kAERA, PENCIL AND PEN alike prove inadequate to picture an 
apartment the arran6ement of ^vhich has been pronounced by com- 
petent critics "a wonder in art-fiirnishin6." The ^rand parlor of 
'v^' the Tampa Bay Hotel is a dream of magnificence indescribable. 
inets of inlaid -wood, pearl and ivory, many of antique design and some 
really hundreds of years old ; beautiful marble figures, statues and statuettes ; 
costly Japanese and Chinese vases ; paintings from the old masters and the 
modern salon — everythin6 artistic that the mind can covet. This mantel is 
an exquisite example of art in -wood-carvin^. 




MANTEL IN GRAND PARLOR. 




vi&AR THE CENTER OF THE GRAND PARLOR is a divan that 
will attract attention, not only because of the beauty of the desi6n 
nd rich upholstering, but on account of its historic associations, 
t is of the time of Marie Antoinette. The frame is intricately 
nd finished in gold ; the covering an exquisitely worked leaf and 
pattern. Thick fringe, reachin6 to the carpet, surroimds the foot. 
From the center and bet-ween the seats of the divan ^rowin^ palms spread 
their broad, rich leaves abo\it. Nearby are easy chairs of corresponding 
design. 



ul tendril 







MARIE ANTOINETTE DIVAN. 




PART OF THE LONG HALLWAY leading from the rotunda to 
^ the dinin6 room is the " Solarium.," a beautiful circular apart= 

\ II ment, full of windows, through which the sun is continually shin- 
qJ ^ ing- It is a sort of conservatory, where tropical and semi-tropical 
^^>^Q^'th.3 abound, many of the specimens of floriculture being rare and 
/■-■^xj^enaive. These plants are changed quite frequently, the hotel conserva= 
tory nearby being well nigh inexhaustible. The flowers are all gro-w^ing 
from fancy urns and vases, the variety, form and beauty of which is as 
^ J noticeable as that of the blooms which they contain. 




IN THE SOLARIUM. 




ISITORS TO FLORIDA EXPECT to be afforded an opportunity to 
c9 pluck from the trees niore or less of the luscious golden 61obes 
^vhich have helped to extend abroad the State's reputation as a semi- 
tropical clime. They have heard of the 6reat orange 6roves and eaten 
of the frT.iit, but naturally desire to see for themselves the trees 
3h produce it in such abundance. In the 6i-ounds between the hotel 
and the river the 6uests of the Tampa Bay Hotel will find a grove of trees, 
amid the olive-colored foliage of which the oranges may be seen hanging in 
^reat clusters, their fragrance filling the air all about. Beyond, above the 
tree tops, can be seen the silvered dom.e and minarets of the hotel, in beauti= 
ful contrast with the dark ^reen leaves of the trees. 




AMONG THE ORANGE TREES. 




OATIHG is one of the most fertile sources of amuseinent in connec- 
tion Avith the hotel life, and a better place than the waters about 
Tampa for a thorough enjoyment of this pleasure -would be hard to 
find. Hillsborough River, extending many miles to the northeast, 
and Hillsborou6h and Tainpa Bays as far as the Gulf of Mexico, 30 miles 
away, are always smooth enough to make boating safe and pleasant. The 
boathouse on the river bank is a favorite resort, the floats commodious and 
stanch, and the electric and naphtha launches, sail and row boats are in 
charge of experienced and careful men. 




BOATHOUSE AND MOORINGS. 




T THE EAST FRONT, LOOKING SOUTH, the scene is enchanting. 
" The Royal Poinciana, •with its ^^ra,v~y, plume-covered boughs is vividly 
pictured against the orna mental architecture. When it is in bloom, 
the bright red flo^vers intermingled with the emerald leaves, sug- 
jstxto the fancy a bird of paradise. Artistic urns hold graceful ferns and 
atrjls — and beds and clusters and borders of rare colors and -wronderful 
foliage are everywhere. At Little Lord Fauntleroy's feet is a bed of native 
flowers, and in the distance the cabbage palmettos rear their stately heads. 




EAbT FRONT, LOOKING SOUTH. 




ROA THE EAST FRONT, LOOKING NORTH, a typical Florida 

vie-w is beheld. At the ri^ht the outstretching leaves of a cocoa 

palm in a bed of ^reen. On the left the pa'w-paw tree, whose fruit 

roAvs in bunches clustered round the trunk near the top. Scarlet 

. ^^^v^i^^nd rich ^reen leaves of a native vine are throvm in brilliant relief 

/ against the soft shadows that fall between the graceful columns and lofty 

I aKches of the porch that stretches away hundreds of feet to the north. This 

\^^;and piazza is pei^haps the finest example of Byzantine art in architecture 

ever seen. 




EAST FRONT.— LOOKING NORTH. 




IDE PIAZZAS shade the east front for almost its entire length. A 
^road, easy flight of steps of the -white Nassau stone leads from the 
la-wn. Three lar^e doors, crested with symmetrical arches of brick 
and terra cotta, form the main entrance. The fretted horse-shoes 
under the eaves of the piazza roof, and the turned, iTioulded and cham- 
fered pendants han^in6 down in their fantastic whiteness, remind one of the 
stalactites in the hidden recesses of a cavern. The arches resting upon 
slender shafts, carved at base and capital and often grouped in twos and 
threes at the indented angles and stair-ways. 




GRAND PIAZZA.— EAST ENTRANCE. 




e^/' 



ROUND THE HOTEL are grounds that have been plotted with 

much care and taste. The intertwining paths run in mazy rounds 

through a diversity of tropical and sub=tropical plants and shrubs. 

.■Herein are the ruins of an old Spanish fort, now nearly covered 

cactus, ^vhich has overrun the ancient cannon and peers over the embank- 

The clusters of its ripe red pears han^ in profusion to the ground, 

cedars, palmettos and opoponax spread their boughs aloft. In the 

fore6round is a thicket of the native sa^v palmetto ; to the left are pine= 

plants. 




AMONG THE PLANTS AND PALMS. 




ROAD, CLEAN LY-SWEPT WALKS traverse the 6rounds. On either 
side are extensive lawns of closely-cropped Bermuda 6rass, softer 
than carpet to the feet; dotting its surface are the Spanish pink, 
varieties of roses, ^eraniiims. Sweet Basil and other flowers. An 
occasional Century plant, with its bristling, needle-pointed leaves, stands 
erect in its pristine pride. In the left foreground is a diminutive loquest, 
bearing a delicioiis yellow plum in the spring. Ado\vn the walk, in the 
distance, are the greenhouses, ■where are propagated and nurtured many of 
the tenderest plants. 




WALKS AND PARTERRES. 




IDESPREADIHG BRANCHES of the grey-bearded patriarch of 
^Florida's forests, the Live Oak, cast a circular shado-w over the 
^-^\l grounds and walks in its iminediate vicinity. Under its protecting 
branches the fatigued inay sit and, while resting, reflect upon the 
beauties of natxire and the inimensity of man's aiTibition. Mid the outstretch^ 
ing arms of the oak cling air plants and festoons of Spanish moss, each 
tenacioiis in its parasitical attachment to the gnarled bark. The approaches 
to the hotel are bordered with choice and rare ferns and flowers. 




FROM UNDER THE LIVE OAK BOUGHS. 




BATED IN THE SHADE, beneath the roof of the ^reat wide piazza 

that extends for nearly the entire length of the hotel building 

proper npon the east front, guests take a leistirely survey of the 

ornam.ental grounds, the smooth, blue Avaters of the Hillsborough 

jTver and bay beyond, dotted here and there \vith craft of all descriptions, 

nd get occasional glimpses through the waving tree-tops of the busy town 

on the east side of the river. This piazza is a favorite promenade and in 

the evening is brilliantly lighted with electric lamps. 




GRAND PIAZZA. — LOOKING SOUTH. 




-'MiD^ THE NORTH SIDE OF THE ROTUNDA between the entrance 
. to the north corridor and one of the ladies' sittin6 rooms, is an 
() ^jebony cabinet carved in designs of great beauty, -v\^ith columns 
p J '^^and embrasures. Several handsome vases are in the open spaces. 
To tRe left is a brass pedestal supportin6 a small half figure of a Mohain- 
medan-; to the ri^ht a small 6ilt table on which sits a porcelain swan, fron:i 
whose back is gro-wing a tropical plant 




ART IN THE CORRIDORS. 




9 

}^i^^?^\J>^yiRY AND BEAUTY are combined in the two ^reat divans that 

form a portion of the furnishings of the ^reat rotunda. Each forms 

the pedestal for a beautiful bronze casting from a celebrated Paris- 

^ian foundry. Given a choice, the critical visitor would probably 

that which ornaments the divan opposite the east entrance to the 

It is an idealization of " The Spinning Girl of the Sovith of France," 

and an extremely beautiful work of art. The pose is very lifelike, and the 

subject recognized at once by those who have wintered abroad. 




THE SPINNING GIRL. 




f\E OF THE AOST POPULAR FEATURES provided by the 
Tampa Bixy Hotel management for the entertainment of its Quests 
is the excellent orchestra of carefully selected iTiusicians, under 
{^^ competent leadership, giving daily concerts on the piazzas and 
■within the hotel. The pro^ramixies are always made vip of the choicest selec- 
tions from the best composers and are beautifully rendered. A " Mornin6 
Concert on the West Piazza " al^A^ays brings together the larger number of the 
Quests of the house, who occupy the comfortable easy chairs or promenade 
about the wide veranda. 




MORNING CONCERT ON WEST PIAZZA. 




IRCLIHG THE AUSIC ROO A is a broad veranda, upon which the 
Quests n:iay stroll or sit, the ^vhile listening to the niusic from 
■within, throu6h the wide arches of the immense circular window's 
running from floor to ceiling. This room is perfectly fitted for 
lecture or tableaux purposes, and the floor is waxed for terpsichorean 
uses. It has a pretty little sta^e, equipped -with footlights, and overhead a 
star and crescent 6leam in electric lights. There are galleries for those who 
prefer to be spectators. During the season the music room is in frequent 
requisition for all sorts of entertainment. 




THE MUSIC-ROOM VERANDA 




'IHG TO THE HEED of increased accommodation at Taixipa Bay 
during the height of the season, there has been erected on the 
, grounds west of the hotel a handsome and commodious structure, 
1^^'fitted and furnished entirely in keeping with the parent house 
and~-^ts surroundings. In the grounds between the new building and the 
hotel are varieties of brilliant hued flowers, in the center of a bed of which 
a fountain plays continuously. Beyond is a piece of bronze statuary repre- 
senting two do^s pointin6 an imaginary covey of quail. The ■walks are paved 
with concrete, and kept as scrupulously neat and clean as those in a private 
garden. 





■i',' 




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NEW ANNEX. — FROM THE HOTEL. 




ESTS WHO ARE FOND OF GUH N I HG have ample opportunity 
for indul^in^ in this favorite sport in the vicinity of the Tampa Bay 
Hotel, and almost every evening throughout the season the result 
of some visitor's steady hand and quick aim is displayed in the 
jtiiXKia. Of the ten varieties of birds that may be killed, snipe, quail and 
plov6r are the most plentiful. The game record book of the hotel gives the 
number of birds killed by a 6uest in one day's shootin6 as 117. An 
excellent "Guide and Do^s " can be engaged at the hotel. 




GUIDE AND DOGS. 




^^ESTS DEPARTING make their exit through the same doorway 
that they entered. It matters not where the destination — north, 
l^^east, west or further south, to journey mayhap to Key West or 
Havana or Mobile by one of the Plant Line steamers from Port 
'"^ajpaga, the train is at the door. A lingering look will be taken at the 
CCTLt^-y, bamboo and rubber plants, and the orange trees ; they will inhale 
again the fragrance of the jessamine as it is wafted from the vines about 
the piazza ; glance up at the crescent-tipped minarets and towers glistening 
in the sun — and resolve to come another winter. Guests departing may 
arrange every detail for their continued journey within the hotel. 




DEPARTURE OF THE TRAIN. 




CL^ 



OUT OYER THE BLUE WATERS of the Bay at Port Tampa, 
near the end of a long pier extending for more than a mile from 
shore, is built the Inn, a cosy and delightful house, which the 
soft breezes from the Gulf makes habitable the year round. It is 
fitted throughout -with all modern improvements and comfortably 
The boating and bathing facilities are excellent, and guests fond 
of fishing may indulge in that sport from the verandas. Plant Line steamers 
y^ Ipave the end of the pier for Key West and Havana, Mobile, St. Petersburg, 
^"'Manatee River, and other points on the Gulf coast. 




THE INN, PORT TAMPA. 



to.. 







LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



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014 542 180 9